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Betteridge Watch Fair – 2017

by on April 18th, 2017

The Betteridge Watch Fair brings the excitement of SIHH- the iconic Swiss watch exhibition- to the US.

On April 27th, it is our privilege to host many of the leading brands in fine watchmaking, including Cartier, A. Lange & Söhne, Panerai, IWC, Jaeger-LeCoultre, and Baume Mercier. Exhibitors are completely transforming areas of our flagship store to showcase many of their latest and greatest 2017 watch introductions.

This is an exclusive opportunity for watch collectors to interact with leaders in the watchmaking world on a personal level, as well as try on the best of the best from SIHH.

Other highlights include three branded bar areas, featuring Cartier champagne, German beers from A. Lange & Söhne, and a Scotch tasting.

Betteridge Watch Fair
April 27, 6-8pm
239 Greenwich Avenue
Greenwich, Connecticut

If you plan to attend, please email rsvp@betteridge.com.

2017 Sale Preview

by on March 31st, 2017

Join us for our Annual Sale and save up to 50% on the finest jewelry and watches!

Sale Dates:
Greenwich Store Sale: Thursday, April 6 – Saturday, April 8
Online Sale: Monday, April 10 – Monday, April 17
Palm Beach Store Sale: Thursday, April 13 – Saturday, April 15

A Flapper’s Ingenuity & Elegance

by on July 1st, 2016

Rarely does combining one generation’s design with another’s meet with success, but in the 1920s, women claimed a new right to define their own style with boldness and genuine audacity, sometimes to fantastic effect.

Pictured here, is an example of the combination of periods, assembled to produce an utterly new jewel that still respects, but re-creates a collector’s prize possession.

Subtly and almost, impossibly graduated colors and sizes of natural pearls move and suspend an equally rare and carefully grouped collection of natural-colored diamonds. Honey and cinnamon brown diamonds find company with iridescent brownish pearls descending into little cascades of pink gulf and conch pearls. Nearly invisible settings of old mine diamonds framed by perfect milgrains and piercings make up the Beaux Arts/Nouveau pendant that is the original long chain of the Edwardian aristocrat, and then the magic happens… The long chain, split at the back, becomes the suspension of the Art Deco colored diamond and black pearl dress clip attached.

Worn with tassels to the diving back or modest front of the flapper’s dress, the complement is stunning in it’s integrity. Every delicate quality of the original pendant is echoed in the perfection and artistry of the Asscher family cuts of kite and square yellow diamonds. The hints of peacock iridescence in the chosen black of the Deco pearls with now brilliant-cut diamonds perfectly paved in geometric settings joins seamlessly to fit the costume of the liberated and striking owner.

Old jewels carry far more than their gems alone. The history and lives of the time always linger, waiting to come back to life, to tell their story together with that of each owner: Worth times worth.

Art Deco Multicolored Diamond & Natural Pearl Necklace with Front & Back Pendant

Art Deco Multicolored Diamond & Natural Pearl Necklace with Front & Back Pendant

An Extraordinary Demi-Parure from the 1860s

by on April 16th, 2016

Time capsules are meant to be rare and wonderful discoveries. To find them in the same condition as when they were first worn is to be transported back (in this case, to the time of the Civil War).

This garnet ‘parure’- set of jewels- is completed by its original French velvet fitted box. There are no repairs and none needed. The gold setting and central natural pearls are rarities reserved for the extraordinary Bohemian work on display here.

1860-70 in its glory.

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2016 Sale Calendar

by on April 14th, 2016

Please join us for our Annual Sale and save up to 60% on exceptional jewels, watches and silver.

Sale Dates
Palm Beach: Friday, April 15 – Saturday, April 16
Greenwich: Friday, April 22 – Sunday, April 24
Online-Only: Tuesday, April 26 – Monday, May 2

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A Jewel’s Meaning: Less Price Point than Story

by on February 7th, 2016

There’s a lot of reasons to give a present and it seems like a new one every day; the culture of giving has grown with the addition of new cultures to the US. Always, the greatest quality of any of these gifts though, is meaning.

Rarity, beauty, craftsmanship and history are a part of the message, but the heart of it, is the heart that gives it. Picking something rare and appealing to someone you know well, carries that care forever. Suddenly, a thing becomes beautiful in a new way, unique to its moment and imbued with qualities of another dimension of thought and memory.

This is why, carefully chosen, a relatively inexpensive engagement ring can be valued as highly as the Hope Diamond: it’s just a matter of meaning.

1920s Old Mine Cut Diamond Princess Ring, $2,200

1920s Old Mine Diamond Princess Ring, $2,200

The 12.10ct Intense Yellow Old Miner

by on December 11th, 2015

Gypsy and $400,000 may sound at odds, but what this ring is… is a Bohemian Rhapsody.

An antique diamond of rare size smoldering a wonderful yellow that is also elegant and wearable! The sort of jewel that completes a festival of cloth, color and bangle or is punctuation to a simple black dress. Itself, a treasure that never screams diamond, but does speak volumes about style and taste: Never cheap, always there and always fun.

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A Flock of Jeweled Birds

by on December 11th, 2015

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They are swallows by the curving swoop of the wing and forked tails; the fighter pilots of the insect eaters. Here, in the iPhone photo from the day I bought them from Argentina, they move whether upside down or tumbling just as the real bird does in flight, but with the added benefit of the tiny spring fitted into a barrel on the pin, to let the diamonds do their stuff and to “tremble” with every step: Mounted “en tremblant”.

At the end of the Beaux Arts period, maybe 1895, these were made by a Parisian of the first order when it came to skills. The upside down bird shows the extraordinary piercing work known as “azuring”…. daylighting, where wonderful geometric patterns give a delicacy that allows cleaning but maintains the strength of the piece.

Done first by an engraver to mark the line, next by the saw piercer who shaped the cuts and finally by the “thrummer,” who threaded cotton cording charged with diamantine powders through the holes and stroked the string up and down the cavities until they were mirror polished- even where no one would ever see after the diamond surface was pavéd.

The flock together is never the same. They tremble and turn; are removed and re-grouped and always show a style and grace marking one of the great periods in truly, high jewelry making.

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Lausanne, from the Dust up at the Foundation of Haute Horologie

by on November 18th, 2015

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This week, I’ve had the privilege of attending the 7th Forum de la Haute Horlogerie held in Lausanne, as an expert for the Americas to the Cultural Council. One of the main topics of discussion: What it means to be High (“Haute”)?

In the millenarian arts, it’s an atelier painstakingly hand-embroidering, stitching and crafting one of a handful of dresses for only the greatest of fashion’s well-heeled followers. Is a Richard Mille, made of space age stuff, its hundred case parts quickly carved by CNC and innovative programming, high? All the complications achieved, but the hand of a craftsman pretty much ignored?

So then, how high? As a myopic, high is close. Look at a Patek Phillipe watch from 1900 where the hands alone, have more real handwork than a million dollars of Richard Milles; a dial of fired, hand painted numerals whose flare was the signature of an individual immediately known for his seraph like no other; as clear a statement of his achievement as it was of his own style. Does the watch with simply stamped or cut hands even belong in the same conversation? I believe it doesn’t.

The difference in this step higher, is finish and finish is just that; taking something to its end. To deliver rough machinery is fine for John Deere and Caterpillar, but not for Haute Horologie. It is in fact, nothing but a profit with the loss of honesty. When timekeeping can be a cellphone and complication is conquered with a key stroke, then doesn’t “finish” and art, become the Height that is excellence?

In my own shops, the finish is the “table stakes”, the non-negotiable. Design and complication are the customers choices. Finish, the beauty of the hand that crafts, will always be the Haute in what we make.

Never forget, that for watchmaker or jeweler, real art is where craft and love join.

In an Overburdened World of “Luxury”

by on November 3rd, 2015

I find the title, “luxury,” given out at every turn, something of an insult. It’s demeaning to the buyer who obviously must rely on another’s taste and knowledge to get something good; it implies he’s nouveau or simply “posing”. For the folks who look and care about the way things are designed and made, it’s just unnecessary and trying too hard.

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Some great things simply stand out for their staking out of new ground; for performing better or simply being the best of what they can be and to me, that’s luxurious.

Patek Phillipe owns the realm of beautifully made, perfectly functioning men’s dress watches, where you really do expect your family to treasure one forever. This Annual Calendar (Ref. 5205G) is everything in elegance and functional investment that a watch could offer.

A fabulous glass to drink from: Whether you have a fine Bordeaux or simply iced tea, there is something wonderful about slowing the moment down and going to a favorite vessel.

I have very old crystal: some hand-engraved with political or religious declarations, sometimes a sailing ship or royal stag. Anything has to taste better held in history and beauty.

Luxury isn’t a magazine telling you something, it’s reveling in the accomplishment and skills of craftsmen and artists and honestly, toasting them: It’s all about them.

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